The Fluke 1732 and 1734 Three-Phase Electrical Energy Loggers identify opportunities for critical energy savings

EVERETT, Wash. -- Feb. 16, 2017 

One of the most significant costs at industrial facilities is energy. While many managers view energy as an unavoidable expense, in reality it is a variable cost that can be monitored and managed, significantly improving the bottom line.

The new Fluke 1732 and 1734 Three-Phase Energy Loggers are powerful tools that are designed to more easily identify sources of electrical energy waste. These new loggers are easy to set up and use, and capture key measurements — voltage, current, power, power factor, and other variables like temperature — to enable managers to understand their energy usage and correlate it to their activities. The new loggers are also Fluke Connect® compatible. Data can be viewed from anywhere via the Fluke Connect mobile app, potentially reducing the number of times a technician must open a panel while wearing full protective equipment.

With the Fluke 1732 and 1734, facility managers and electricians can:

  • Easily discover wasted energy to reduce energy bills.
  • Perform energy studies over a range of electrical power and energy parameters.
  • Perform simple current-only load studies.
  • Use the 1734 to perform advanced energy and load studies with connected data from Fluke Connect modules.

“Energy use in industrial plants is one of the most important areas where costs can be reduced, yet most facility managers are not even aware of how their energy is consumed,” said Paul de la Port, President, Fluke Industrial Group. “The Fluke 1732 and 1734 Energy Loggers deliver a complete picture that identifies opportunities for savings and provides actionable data to reduce energy costs to improve the bottom line.”

The Fluke energy loggers:

  • Measure all three phase conductors: with included three flexible current probes.
  • Provide comprehensive logging: more than 20 separate logging sessions can be stored on the instruments and all measured values are automatically logged to retain measurement trends.
  • Can be powered by the measurement circuit: eliminating the need to find a power outlet and run power cord extensions.
  • Feature fully integrated logging: connect other Fluke Connect devices to the Fluke 1734 to simultaneously log up to two other measurement parameters — virtually any parameter available on a Fluke Connect wireless digital multimeter or module.
  • Can be set up completely in the field through the front panel: no need to return to the workshop for download and setup or to take a computer to the electrical panel as data can be downloaded directly to USB memory stick or via local Wi-Fi. The quick, guided, graphical setup ensures that the right data is captured every time, and the intelligent verification function indicates correct connections have been made, reducing user uncertainty.

The 1732 and 1734 also include the new Energy Analyze Plus application software that delivers more advanced analysis capabilities to better correlate data and make better decisions.

The loggers are rated 600 V CAT IV/1000 V CAT III — the highest safety rating in the industry — for safe use at the service entrance and downstream.

For more information on the Fluke 1732 and 1734 Three-Phase Electrical Energy Loggers, visit www.fluke.com/1734.

Fluke Corporation
For information on Fluke tools and applications, or to find the location of a distributor, contact Fluke Corporation, P.O. Box 9090, Everett, WA USA 98206, call (800) 44-FLUKE (800-443-5853), fax (425) 446-5116, e-mail fluke-info@fluke.com or visit the Fluke Web site at www.fluke.com.

About Fluke
Founded in 1948, Fluke Corporation is the world leader in compact, professional electronic test tools and software for measuring and condition monitoring. Fluke customers are technicians, engineers, electricians, maintenance managers, and metrologists who install, troubleshoot, and maintain industrial, electrical, and electronic equipment and calibration processes.

Upcoming Events

August 9 - August 11 2022

MaximoWorld 2022

View all Events
banner
80% of Reliabilityweb.com newsletter subscribers report finding something used to improve their jobs on a regular basis.
Subscribers get exclusive content. Just released...MRO Best Practices Special Report - a $399 value!
DOWNLOAD NOW
Harmonizing PMs

Maintenance reliability is, of course, an essential part of any successful business that wants to remain successful. It includes the three PMs: predictive, preventive and proactive maintenance.

How an Edge IoT Platform Increases Efficiency, Availability and Productivity

Within four years, more than 30 per cent of businesses and organizations will include edge computing in their cloud deployments to address bandwidth bottlenecks, reduce latency, and process data for decision support in real-time.

MaximoWorld 2022

The world's largest conference for IBM Maximo users, IBM Executives, IBM Maximo Partners and Services with Uptime Elements Reliability Framework and Asset Management System is being held Aug 8-11, 2022

6 Signs Your Maintenance Team Needs to Improve Its Safety Culture

When it comes to people and safety in industrial plants, maintenance teams are the ones who are most often in the line of fire and at risk for injury or death.

Making Asset Management Decisions: Caught Between the Push and the Pull

Most senior executives spend years climbing through the operational ranks. In the operational ranks, many transactional decisions are required each day.

Assume the Decision Maker Is Not Stupid to Make Your Communication More Powerful

Many make allowances for decision makers, saying some are “faking it until they make it.” However, this is the wrong default position to take when communicating with decision makers.

Ultrasound for Condition Monitoring and Acoustic Lubrication for Condition-Based Maintenance

With all the hype about acoustic lubrication instruments, you would think these instruments, once turned on, would do the job for you. Far from it!

Maintenance Costs as a Percent of Asset Replacement Value: A Useful Measure?

Someone recently asked for a benchmark for maintenance costs (MC) as a percent of asset replacement value (ARV) for chemical plants, or MC/ARV%.

OEM recommended maintenance plans

One-third of CEO Terrence O'Hanlon's colleagues think so - at least as a starting point. What do you have to say?