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The handheld Fluke 810 is designed and programmed to diagnose the most common mechanical problems of unbalance, looseness, misalignment and bearing failures in a wide variety of mechanical equipment, including motors, fans, blowers, belts and chain drives, gearboxes, couplings, pumps, compressors, closed coupled machines and spindles.

When it detects a fault, the Fluke 810 identifies the problem and rates its severity on a four-level scale to help the maintenance professional prioritize maintenance tasks. It also recommends repairs. Context-sensitive on-board help menus provide new users with real-time guidance and tips.

Today many industrial maintenance teams work under severe financial and time constraints. The Fluke 810 Vibration Tester uses a simple step-by-step process to report on machine faults the first time measurements are taken, without prior measurement history. The combination of plain-text diagnoses, severity ratings and repair recommendations helps users make better maintenance decisions and address critical problems first.

Typical vibration analyzers and software are intended for monitoring machine condition over the longer term, but they require special training and investment that may not be possible in many companies. The Fluke 810 is designed specifically for maintenance professionals who need to troubleshoot mechanical problems and quickly understand the root cause of equipment condition.

Mechanical diagnosis with the Fluke 810 begins when the user places the Fluke triaxial TEDS accelerometer on the machine under test. The accelerometer has a magnetic mount and can also be installed by attaching a mounting pad using adhesive. A quick-disconnect cable connects the accelerometer to the Fluke 810 tester. As the machine under test operates, the accelerometer detects its vibration along three planes of movement and transmits that information to the Fluke 810. Using a set of advanced algorithms, the 810 Vibration Tester then provides a plain-text diagnosis of the machine with a recommended solution.

A New Approach to Machine Testing

Evaluating mechanical equipment typically requires comparing its condition over time to a previously established baseline condition. Vibration analyzers used in condition-based monitoring or predictive maintenance programs rely upon these baseline conditions to evaluate machine condition and estimate remaining operating life.

In contrast, the Fluke 810 is a troubleshooting tool that analyzes current machinery condition and identifies faults by comparing vibration data to an extensive set of rules developed over years of field experience. The Fluke 810 determines fault severity using a unique technology to simulate a fault-free condition and establish a baseline for instant comparison to gathered data. This means that every measurement taken is compared to a “like new” machine.

Viewer Application Software

The Fluke 810 Vibration Tester includes Viewer PC software, compatible with Windows XP and Vista, to expand its data storage and tracking capability. With Viewer the user can:

— Create machine setups at the computer keyboard and transfer the data to the 810 Vibration Tester.

— Generate diagnostic reports in a PDF file format.

— View vibration spectra in greater detail.

— Import and store JPEG images and Fluke .IS2 thermal images for a more complete view of a machine’s condition.

The Fluke 810 Vibration Tester comes with embedded diagnostic technology, triaxial TEDS accelerometer, accelerometer magnet mount, accelerometer mounting pad kit with adhesive, accelerometer quick-disconnect cable, laser tachometer and storage pouch, smart battery pack with cable and adapters, shoulder strap, adjustable hand strap, Viewer PC application software, mini-USB to USB cable, Getting Started Guide, illustrated Quick Reference Guide, User Manual CD-ROM and a hard carrying case.

The Fluke 810 Vibration Tester will start shipping in April 2010.

For more information on the Fluke 810 Vibration Tester, contact Fluke Corporation, P.O. Box 9090, Everett, WA USA 98206-9090, call 800-760-4523 or visit www.fluke.com/vibration.

About Fluke

Fluke Corporation is the leader in compact, professional electronic test tools. Fluke customers are technicians, engineers, electricians, metrologists and building diagnostic professionals who install, troubleshoot, and manage industrial electrical, mechanical and electronic equipment and calibration processes for quality control as well as conducting building restoration and remediation services. Fluke is a registered trademark of Fluke Corporation in the United States and/or other countries. The names of actual companies and products mentioned herein may be the trademarks of their respective owners.

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