A steam trap can be replaced in minutes instead of hours, enabling steam systems to be kept at peak performance and energy efficiency. Plant downtime is also reduced significantly.

Traditionally, steam traps are welded or screwed into the pipeline and considerable work is needed to replace them. Often this means that an underperforming steam trap needing maintenance is left in place for a significant period until safe access can be arranged.

The single-piece body of the STS17.2 also virtually eliminates the potential leak paths caused by screwed connections that conventional steam trapping stations and on-site fabricated installations typically suffer.

“The STS17.2’S's innovative leak-free stainless steel body helps steam system operators to further reduce carbon emissions,” says Paul Mayoh, Spirax Sarco Product Manager. Total cost of ownership is lowered through the use of high performance stainless steel components, ensuring long and trouble-free operation.”

Apart from the steam traps themselves, no other components need to be specified or purchased, eliminating the time, cost and inconvenience needed to select, size, build and install a conventional steam trapping station.

An important safety feature of the STS17.2 is the inclusion of lockable handles on the isolation valves to help ensure maintenance can be carried out safely by minimising the possibility of accidental operation. Internal parts including the ball valves, check valve and strainer screen can all be replaced easily.

A new option with the STS17.2 is the double isolation adapter. This provides added security of two upstream isolation valves and allows the replacement of steam traps whilst the system is live, eliminating the need for plant downtime. This can also be considered for upstream and downstream applications for more specific maintenance procedures.

The STS17.2 boasts several other options such as an automatic steam trap monitoring facility and strainer blowdown valves to further reduce maintenance. The compact design of the STS17.2 allows it to squeeze into positions that are too tight to accommodate traditional steam trapping stations built from separate components.

Although there are several connector steam traps available, selection here is further simplified by considering thermodynamic for mains drainage and float for heat exchanger applications. Steam traps can be changed or maintained quickly with only two bolt connections without breaking the pipeline.

The new trapping station is suitable for clean steam and filtered applications such as hospital sterilisers, dairy production, food and beverage processing and some pharmaceutical plants. No sizing or selection is required for the STS17.2 and it is considered suitable for all steam main applications up to 10 bar g and DN150 line size.

Other applications can be sized using the appropriate Quick-Fit steam trap selection data and then selecting the same size STS17.2. The majority of applications will use the ½” or DN 15 unit.

For more information on the STS17.2 please visit www.spiraxsarco.com/uk/sts17.2, email uk.enquires@uk.spiraxsarco.com or call 01242 535319.

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