“Industries such as oil and gas and chemical processing are increasingly recognizing the value of vibration monitoring as a predictive maintenance tool and as a cost savings measure,” said Tom Smith, Vice President of Sales and Marketing. “To best serve these customers, we certified several of our most popular vibration sensors as Class I Division 2.” Other industries that commonly have Class I Division 2 (Zone 2) hazardous areas are mining, steel, petrochemical processing, and pharmaceuticals.

The six sensors which received the Class I Division 2 (Zone 2) certification all have a sensitivity of 100 mV/g, and a tight +5% sensitivity tolerance, commonly called general purpose industrial accelerometers. The standard top exit model is the 786A-D2. The standard side exit model is the 787A-D2, which is also available with a metric M8 mounting stud, model 787A-M8-D2. The 780A-D2 is a compact sensor ideal for portable data collection. The integral cable model is the 786F-D2. The 786T-D2 is a dual output model that senses both vibration and temperature.

Three compatible connector-cable assemblies, suitable for Class I Division 2 (Zone 2) environments, are also offered by Wilcoxon Research. Each cable connector can be lock wired to prevent it from inadvertently backing off the sensor. The R6D2-J9T2A mates a MILC-C-5015 style 2-pin connector with a twisted pair, Teflon® jacketed cable for harsh, 200°C industrial environments. The R6D2-J10 mates a MIL-C-5015 2-pin connector with a twisted pair cable; the cable has an Enviroprene jacket, suited to 125°C industrial environments. The R6D2-J9T2A and R6D2-J10 are compatible with all of the Class I Division 2 (Zone 2) sensors except the 786T-D2. The 786T-D2 sensor.is compatible with the R6GD2-J9T3A, a three pin connector and three wire cable with Teflon® jacket.

The sensors were approved by agencies in both North America and Europe. CSA certified the six sensors to be rated for use in Class I Division 2, Groups A, B, C, D, E, F, G environments. Kema approved the sensors for ATEX operation in Class I Zone 2 AEx na IIC T4. Class I Division 2 (Zone 2) certification is not available for cables, however the R6D2-J9T2A, R6D2-J10, and R6GD2-J9T3A are deemed suitable for installation in hazardous areas. The final installation certification of the cables is determined by the governing authority.

To learn more about the Class I Division 2 (Zone 2) sensors and suitable cables online, visit http://www.wilcoxon.com/knowdesk/Class%20I%20Division%202%20accelerometer%20information.pdf  and http://www.wilcoxon.com/vi_intrinsic.cfm

To learn more about Wilcoxon Research, Inc., or the pledge of Total Lower Cost of Ownership, visit www.wilcoxon.com or call 800-WILCOXON

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