Enhanced corrosion resistance has become an ever more important requirement in many different industries - with stainless steel gaining in importance because the material not only safeguards hygiene standards, but also ensures a long service life, low or no maintenance and therefore makes for safe investments.

The Ganter range of products has always featured many standard elements made of non-rusting steel. But stainless steel is not necessary the same as stainless steel: today’s material compendiums list around 120 grades with different alloy proportions. While Ganter has so far focused on the use of A2 grade, one of the market leaders in standard parts now offers selected products in the even more corrosion-resistant A4 variant - specially intended for use in chloride-rich environment, for instance within reach of the sea.

These include the matt shot-blasted handwheels GN 227.4, DIN 39 ball grips, drop-forged DIN 580 eyebolts and eye nuts DIN 582. The hinges GN 237, GN 128.2 and GN 129.2 are now available in A4 stainless steel, and so are cabinet “U” handles (GN 425), star knobs (GN 5334.4), three-star handles (GN 5345.4), and one and twoarmed clamp nuts (GN 99.6 and GN 99.8) as well as slotted and split set collars (GN 706.2 and GN 707.2).

It is mainly the chrome, nickel and molybdenum constituents which lend the A4 austenite steel its high resistance against chloride and acids. All this makes Ganter’s A4 standard parts the ideal choice not only for use in shipbuilding or in the offshore industry, but also for the food sector, for pharmaceutical and medical applications or for swimming pool construction with its chlorinated water or water rich in minerals. A wide field, in other words. One reason why Ganter will gradually enlarge and expand its offer of standard parts in A4 stainless steel. Find out more at www.ganter-griff.com

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