CRL 1-hr: Nov 7 Introduction to Uptime Elements Reliability Framework and Asset Management System

The 10 Commandments of RCM - Keys for the Success of an RCM Implementation Project
number 10 parking space

ABSTRACT:

1) You will make RCM according to SAE JA 1011 and JA 1012 standards.You need to see the importance of the SAE standard for the development of a 100% reliable methodology. Understand also the risks of the streamlined methodologies, which do not comply with the standard and therefore are not RCM.

2) You will obtain support from Top Management.
You must sell the idea to the Top Managers, raising clear cost-benefit relationship and the importance of the subject in risk situations.

3) You will not be Self-trained.
The serious conceptual mistakes that are made, added to the tremendous effort that means the "trial and error" procedures, drive the attempts to be: ineffective, not satisfying the results expectations, and most of the times also dangerous, due to the serious omissions that are committed.

4) You will provide the basic training for Top Management.
Top Managers badly informed and/or not trained, badly can plan a project in a suitable form. It is required to learn and to know the process to clearly be able to plan its implementation.

5) You will make a Pilot Project.
According to experience you should always begin by a pilot area, so that the learning process in the company is progressive. The initial lessons will help you to accelerate the process in the subsequent stages. Also the results obtained in this stage, will allow you to justify in a better way the later expansion to the rest of the Company.

6) You will not begin without a Detailed Planning.
As much in the Pilot stage as in the Expansion one, you should plan in detail all the steps of the project, not to do it, or not to respect it once done it, is one of the most frequent causes of failure of the technique. There is an order in the steps that must be respected.

7) You will establish a Control Score-Card with Key Indicators.
The follow-up of the project is critical to assure the results. To do this a Control Score-Card with suitable Key Indicators is of vital importance.

8) You will make the Results Evaluation and the Audits.
The Results should be evaluated so much "A priori", whatever I hope to obtain, like "A posteriori", whatever I obtained. On the other hand you must develop Audits to assure the quality of the process, as well as the applicability, good sense, feasibility and worth-doing of the defined tasks and results.

9) You will expand the Project.
If the results and the audits guarantee it, the project must continue. For this, new cycles of Planning-Control-Results-Audit, must be made. The expansion must be continuous and be supported to assure the target of reaching the "critical mass" that allows, in the long term, to assure the continuity of the project. Remember that the RCM is not a fashion, it is a life style!

10) You will enjoy Reliability.
As the project goes on, you must inform and communicate to Top Management, as much as to all the colleagues in the Company about the project development. This is the way to assure the results and the application of the decisions made. You must show the results obtained. If you did your job well, successfully results will appear.

Enjoy the prestige gained, without falling asleep in the laurels. Enjoy the possibility of returning home early, proud to work in a safer plant. Enjoy Reliability!

1 YOU WILL MAKE RCM ACCORDING TO SAE JA 1011 AND JA 1012 STANDARDS

You need to see the importance of the SAE standard for the development of a 100% reliable methodology. Understand also the risks of the streamlined methodologies, which do not comply with the standard and therefore are not RCM.

There are in the market many methodologies for determining maintenance strategies, some are better other worse, why then the need for a standard and not let users test them by trial and error, and select the methodology that they understand is the best for their case? There is no better explanation than that given in the standards:

"The Reliability Centered Maintenance (RCM) was originally developed by the commercial aviation industry to improve safety and reliability of its equipment. It was first documented in a report written by F.S. Nowlan and H.F. Heap and published by the Department of Defense of the United States of America in 1978. Since then, the RCM has been used to help formulate strategies for managing physical assets in virtually all areas of human activity organized, and in virtually all industrialized countries of the world.

This process defined by Nowlan and Heap has served as the basis for implementing a number of documents in which the RCM process has been developed and refined in subsequent years. Many of these documents preserved key elements of the original process. However, the widespread use of the name "RCM" has led to the emergence of a large number of processes which differ significantly from the original, but also that its proponents call "RCM". Many of these other processes fail to achieve the objectives of Nowlan and Heap, some are counterproductive and several are even dangerous.

As a result, there has been a demand for an international standard that establishes criteria to be met by a process so it can be called "RCM".

The SAE JA 1011 meets that need."

The standard SAE JA 1011 was published in August 1999.

"The SAE JA 1012 standard, is a guide for the standard of RCM, but is not intended to be a manual or a guide of procedures for conducting the RCM. Those who wish to apply RCM are invited to seriously study the matter in greater detail, and develop their skills under the guidance of experienced certified professionals of RCM."
The standard SAE JA 1012 was published in January 2002.

Both standards could be obtained at www.sae.org.

Many of the procedures that do not comply with SAE standards, among other things fail at the issue of Failure Modes.

In section 5.3 of SAE JA 1011 standard the following is mentioned:

"5.3.1 All the failure modes reasonably likely to cause each functional failure should be identified.

5.3.2 The method used to decide what constitutes a "reasonably likely" failure mode shall be acceptable to the owner or user of the asset.

5.3.3 Failure modes shall be identified at a level of causation that makes it possible to identify an appropriate failure management policy.

5.3.4 Lists of failure modes shall include failure modes that have happened before, failure modes that are currently being prevented by existing maintenance programs and failure modes that have not yet happened but that are thought to be reasonably likely (credible) in the operating context.

5.3.5 Lists of failure modes should include any event or process that is likely to cause a functional failure, including deterioration, design defects, and human error whether caused by operators or maintainers (unless human error is being actively addressed by analytical processes apart from RCM). And in section 8.2 of SAE JA 1012 standard is mentioned, among other things, the following:

"Note that the decision to list a failure mode should be tempered by a consideration of its consequences. If the consequences are likely to be very severe indeed, then less likely failure modes should be listed and subjected to further analysis."

The procedures that do not comply with SAE standards, usually only lists the first two groups mentioned by the standard, those already occurred and those being prevented, forgetting those who do not have occurred but are likely to occur, and forgetting all those who remain unlikely, but having very serious consequences.

Among the latter are the so-called "hidden failures" (A failure mode whose effects do not become apparent to the operating crew under normal circumstances if the failure mode occurs on its own), that are "protective systems" (A device or system which is intended to avoid, eliminate, or minimize the consequences of failure of some other system) with no inherent safety.

In our experience of implementing RCM according to SAE standard, we noted that more than 40% of the failure modes listed are hidden failures.

These failure modes, after being analyzed with RCM, in approximately 90% of them it is being selected failure finding task (detective maintenance) as the most appropriate task for its proper handling.

All the failure finding tasks (detective) represents approximately more than 35% of the listed failure modes, if we add to this that on average, on condition maintenance (predictive) represents approximately 25% and the scheduled discard and scheduled restoration (preventive) represents together an additional 5%. We conclude that in maintenance plans as defined by RCM according to SAE standard, the failure finding tasks (detective) account for more than half (about 55%) of all the planned tasks in our new maintenance plans.

If we compare this with the reality that the traditional maintenance programs, still in use in many companies around the world, includes not more than a total of 10% of all the protective devices that exist in modern plants. And that processes that do not comply to SAE standards do not improve this aspect by not considering failure modes of low frequency, but with potentially severe consequences, then we can conclude that these supposed "modern systems for strategies definition" that do not comply to SAE standards, are leaving out of the analysis over 90% of the protective devices of the plants, creating a high risk of damage to the safety and the environment and therefore not ensuring the proper reliability that they should ensure.

That is why we say that the methods that do not comply with SAE standards, generally known as Streamlined RCM, are truly dangerous and should not be considered.

2 YOU WILL OBTAIN SUPPORT FROM TOP MANAGEMENT

You must sell the idea to the Top Managers, raising clear cost-benefit relationship and the importance of the subject in risk situations.

Any plan for implementing RCM is intensive in the use of resources, it requires external consultancy, a significant amount of internal labor and other material resources such as meeting room, computer equipment, etc.

To ensure the support of Top Management, we should take the following steps:

- Short presentation on RCM Concepts to Top Management.
- A priori cost-benefit evaluation, considering financial KPI's such as NPV and/or IRR, the investment needed and their potential outcomes.
- Short presentation on cost-benefit evaluation results to Top Management.
- Approval and adoption of the draft by Top Management.

In general it is recommended to the development of these stages, to look for support of external consultancy, because the internal staff, having not yet received adequate knowledge and training in RCM, lacks the expertise to assess the potential benefits of the technique, and thus increase their chances of success when it is supported by external consultants with experience in the implementation and presentation of RCM concepts.

For the presentation, we recommend that is not longer than half a day, where in summary presents the RCM concepts and technique, its application and its potential benefits. So we begin by "selling the idea".

To make an assessment of the potential outcomes that the assets to be analyzed can generate, we must compare actual performance with the results of possible improvements.

It is important to obtain information on the availability, the mean time between failures, the risks that it will show, both on safety and on the environment, as well as operating and maintenance costs of the assets to be evaluated.

Professionals with experience in the implementation of RCM can help a lot in these calculations.

It is generally taken as a key indicator, the profits generated by each RCM analysis on the number of failure modes that were modified in the study; on this basis we can make an assessment of benefits, complementary to the previous one, which allows to ratify such estimations.

This evaluation is done by estimating the number of failure modes of the equipment to be studied, how many of them would change, and multiply the changed failure modes by the profit estimated for each possible failure mode, and an overall result would be obtained for such equipment, which can be compared to possible improvements in availability and mean time between failures, and express the economic benefits obtainable per year.

For example: Suppose a system with 200 FM (failure modes) (in our experience RCM groups can analyze, depending on their training, systems between 100 and 300 FM), of whom we estimate that the strategies will be modified in 40% of them (in our experience this range is between 30% and 50%), and we estimate moderate earnings per FM of about US$ 500 per annum (in our experience we can say that in manufacturing industry, each FM generates annual profits of between US$ 100 to US$ 1,000 per annum, for mining industry this value is multiplied by 2.5).

With these data we estimate the total annual benefit, which will be:

Annual Profit of the Asset = 200 FM x 40% x 500 US$/FM = US$ 40,000 for a single RCM study.

If the studied assets has several similar to them in the company, and in similar operational context also, then we can apply what we call, "Templating", or once studied the first one, with little additional effort, it can be done studies for the others just making adjustments in what changes from one to another, (the development of Templating is not the subject of this paper). We also call this "the multiplier factor" from the benefits point of view

This multiplier factor allows us to say that if we have two similar assets, then the outcome in terms of benefits will be multiplied by two, when we implement the new plans developed with RCM to those two assets.

So the overall result is:

Annual Profit of the Templated Group of Assets = Annual Profit of the Asset x Nº of Assets to Template (multiplier factor) = US$ 40,000 x 2 = US$ 80,000.

If in the pilot project we studied, say two different assets, which meet the above conditions, then the results are:

Annual Benefit of a Pilot Project = Annual Profit of the Templated Group of Assets x Nº of Assets studied in Pilot Project = US$ 80,000 x 2 = US$ 160,000.

Then they must be considered all costs, both internal and external, own staff, equipments (meeting rooms, computer equipment, etc.) and external consulting.

It is generally estimated that the internal cost of implementation is approximately twice the cost of external consultancy to support the implementation. (Internal cost refers to man-hours of staff and labor assigned to RCM analysis groups, as well as the time spent by the coordinators of the project, and the costs of other materials involved such as office materials, computer equipment purchased, etc.).

Let's say, if the external cost of a Pilot Project is US$ 45,000, and internal cost is twice, US$ 90,000, then:

Total Cost of a Pilot Project = Internal Cost + External Cost = US$ 90,000 + US$ 45,000 = US$ 135,000.

With the costs and benefits already calculated, we can now conduct cost-benefit assessment, by calculating the NPV (Net Present Value) and the IRR (Internal Rate of Return) to submit to the Top Management and show the benefits that the project can generate as well as its profitability.

Taking then a Total Cost of US$ 135,000; compared with a Total Annual Profit of US$ 160,000; which gives us:

NPV > US$ 870,000 - calculated for 10 years with a rate of 8%.
NPV > US$ 500,000 - calculated for 5 years with a rate of 8%.
IRR > 105% - calculated for 3 years.
Repaid Period < 1 year - after implementing new strategies.

WHICH TOP MANAGEMENT OF ANY COMPANY COULD REJECT A PROJECT AS PROFITABLE?

The important thing to remember is: To start a project of the magnitude of the RCM is not possible without the support of Top Management.
Many of the failure stories of RCM implementations, are precisely due to this aspect, groups that are beginning to make RCM motivated perhaps by the Maintenance Chief, but without the explicit support of Top Management, then when these groups are beginning to require resources, for training programs, consulting or personnel time for meetings, these resources are not available and the system fails. AVOID THESE FAILURES!

3 YOU WILL NOT BE SELF-TRAINED

The serious conceptual mistakes that are made, added to the tremendous effort that means the "trial and error" procedures, drive the attempts to be: ineffective, not satisfying the results expectations, and most of the times also dangerous, due to the serious omissions that are committed.

There is a tendency in some companies to try to begin the implementation of RCM without external support, on the basis of having attended, a few people in the company, to any training program on the subject, or have read any book about it.

The experience shows that, even though the technique is not as difficult to learn, it is very much difficult to apply and implement, because implies a great deal of commitment off all the participants in the project, from Top Management till Personnel at shop floor level, and this commitment reaches the point of requiring changes in practices, habits and behaviors, ultimately will require changes in the paradigms that these people have on the maintenance aspects of the plant.

These changes are neither easy nor quick and require a significant and sustained push to ensure success.

The experience developed by trained and certified consultants, highly qualified in the implementation of RCM technique, allows the company to walk across the start up period of RCM, in a smooth and calm way, assuring the expected results.
Some of the typical mistakes that self-trained groups commit are:

- Wrong selection of the analysis level of the RCM study to be developed.
- To confuse functions with failure modes, especially in cases of complex failure modes.
- Not to include all operating parameters in the function description.
- To forget secondary functions.
- Wrong description of protective functions.
- To indicate capacity parameters instead of functional parameters.
- To forget functional failures.
- To confuse functional failures with failure modes.
- To confuse failure modes with failure effects.
- Don't know when to stop listing failure modes.
- To forget failure modes reasonably likely.
- Don't know how much detail is necessary and enough in determining failure modes.
- Incomplete description of failure effects.
- Wrong consequence evaluation.
- Not to verify all the technically feasible criteria.
- Not to verify all the worth doing criteria.
- To confuse on condition task (predictive maintenance) with failure finding task (detective maintenance).
- Wrong calculation of tasks frequencies.
- To confuse different life concepts, like useful life and average life.

Just to mention some of them.

The cost of trial and error, it is always more expensive, and the expected time span of the project is much longer, than relying on external support.
Moreover, in most cases do not reach results, not even satisfactory ones, committing as we said, serious conceptual mistakes, leading to outcomes that can be hazardous and dangerous too.

4 YOU WILL PROVIDE THE BASIC TRAINING FOR TOP MANAGEMENT

Top Managers badly informed and/or not trained, badly can plan a project in a suitable form. It is required to learn and to know the process to clearly be able to plan its implementation.

Once the conceptual idea was presented and sold, through a cost-benefit assessment, to Top Management, as mentioned in item 2; what must be done is to start by providing Basic RCM Training to the Top Management and their staff, so that they understand the RCM methodology and concepts involved in a comprehensive way.

Only then, a successful planning of the RCM project to be developed can be made.

Experience shows that the minimum training that should be receive by Top Management, is a One Day Top Management Seminar, but the ideal is to receive the complete training program of Introduction to RCM of 3 Days (3D-RCM).

The 3D-RCM will enable them to familiarize themselves with the tool and its implications, and having gone through the same process that their staff will do, will allow a better understanding of the methodology that will lead to a more detailed and comprehensive planning, which is the Key to the success of the implementation.

5 YOU WILL MAKE A PILOT PROJECT

According to experience you should always begin by a pilot area, so that the learning process in the company is progressive. The initial lessons will help you to accelerate the process in the subsequent stages. Also the results obtained in this stage, will allow you to justify in a better way the later expansion to the rest of the Company.

The start with a pilot project is based on several reasons:

- It's easier to sell the idea because the initial investment is lower.
- Allows limiting the risk, so as to better control the many variables that affect the process.
- Since this is a process of change, limit it to a small group of people in initial form, it facilitates the introduction of new practices and their acceptance in the organization.
- Also other people will be more likely to change once they "see" the results.
- The results of a pilot project, allows the recalculation of the potential benefits, using experience of the company itself and not only the consultant one.
- On the basis of a pilot project and its results in our plant, the planning of a larger project becomes more "credible", as well as the estimation of its potential benefits.
- The moving forward step by step in the process of change gives "safety" to the organization and allows consolidating the results achieved in the previous phase, prior to the next stage.

A pilot project must begin with a critical area of the company, so its results will truly impact on the organization.

We call a critical area where we are getting results that are lower than our expectations, and seriously affecting business. To do so we must consider both aspects: risk (safety and environmental) and economics (operational and non-operational).

The practical recommendation is to start with at least two assets in the pilot project, but could be a higher number.

We do not recommend conducting a pilot project with more than six assets under consideration.

The duration of a pilot project can be as short as one month and a half (for cases of full time schedule), or as long as six months (in case of weekly schedule). It depends on the intensity of the commitment of the staff and personnel of the company, the amount of time that the project will last.

6 YOU WILL NOT BEGIN WITHOUT A DETAILED PLANNING

As much in the Pilot stage as in the Expansion one, you should plan in detail all the steps of the project, not to do it, or not to respect it once done it, is one of the most frequent causes of failure of the technique. There is an order in the steps that must be respected.

All RCM project must be planned in detail, for this the steps to be followed are:

- To appoint a General Coordinator of the Project, with access to the CEO of the Company.
- To appoint Local Coordinators in each plant or sector (for large companies), with access to the Plant Manager.
- To train the abovementioned Coordinators with the basic training of RCM (Introduction to RCM, 3 Days Course).
- To conduct criticality analysis (priority) of assets.
- To select critical assets.
- To select the Personnel (operations, maintenance, engineering, spare-stores, shopping, etc.) that best know the assets selected.
- To select facilitators who will lead the RCM groups.

- To schedule the training of such personnel:
- Introduction to RCM, 3 Days Course.
- Facilitators Training in RCM, 10 Days Course.
- Induction training in RCM (Basic concepts), half a day course. For personnel not actively participating in RCM analysis groups.

- To schedule RCM analysis group meetings, indicating a detailed timetable of meetings and venues (where and when).
- To schedule external consultancy support for such meetings. Our experience indicates that in the first cycle of analysis, a beginner group needs not less than 50% of the meetings supported by the external consultant.
- To schedule results assessment and audit of the analysis. Remember that the audit should be either external (to ensure proper application of the RCM technique, ex. Consultant), as internal (to ensure the satisfaction of the technical responsible of the assets with the results, ex. Plant Manager).
- To schedule the load of the new strategies to the Assets Management Systems (EAM or CMMS).
- To schedule the start up of the new strategies.
- To schedule implementation audit of the new strategies at shop floor level.
- To schedule results presentation both to Top Management and the staff and personnel of the Company.
- To schedule the adequate communication campaign throughout the process of the project, to disseminate the achievements and progress to be made in its development.

- Ensuring continuous feedback, with regular meetings between coordinators, facilitators and consultants, so that good practice can be multiplied and mistakes are not repeated. In this way we will achieve a continuous learning organization.

Ultimately, RCM is not a destination but a journey; we must have leadership and know the step-by-step route to go through it successfully.

7 YOU WILL ESTABLISH A CONTROL SCORE-CARD WITH KEY INDICATORS

The follow-up of the project is critical to assure the results. To do this a Control Score-Card with suitable Key Indicators is of vital importance.

It should be establish a Control Score Card for monitoring of the project, with appropriate level of detail, which brought out clearly the milestones of the project.

The Control Score Card must be under the responsibility of the General Coordinator of the Project.

It will be completed on the basis of the Follow Up Reports that each RCM analysis group should send after each meeting of analysis.

The RCM Control Score Card should indicate aspects such as:

- Plant where RCM analysis is being developed.
- Assets, Systems and Subsystems under consideration in the RCM project.
- Identification code for each RCM group.
- Name of group facilitator.
- Names of group members.
- Starting date of the analysis.
- Finishing date of the analysis.
- Number of meetings for the analysis.
- Average presence of group members during meetings.
- Follow up of work in progress during analysis.

- Operational Context.
- Functions
- Functional Failures
- Failure Modes in Information Worksheet with Failure Effects.
- Failure Modes in Decision Worksheet with Consequences Evaluation and task Definition.
- Results Evaluation (also "A Priori" and "A Posteriori" of the project)
- Date for final Audit, and Qualification Report of the Audit.
- Date of Loading new strategies to Assets Management System.
- Date of start up of the new tasks.
- Date of Plant Floor Audit to check execution of new tasks according to the new plan.
- Date of final presentation of Results and Benefits to Top Management.

Among the Key Indicators to measure are included:
- Number of assets analyzed.
- Numer of meetings per asset analyzed.
- Number meeting hours per asset analyzed.
- Developing rhythm, calculated as failures modes per meeting hour analyzed.
- Global Benefits, calculated as annual returns, including operational as well as maintenance returns.
- Benefits calculated as annual returns per asset analyzed.
- Benefits calculated as annual returns per failure mode with change in strategy.
- Internal Return Rate of the Project (IRR).
- Net Present Value of the Project (NPV).

The list of indicators can be expanded considering the resources invested and the productivity of the project.

The key is that the Control Score Card must be brought up to date from the very beginning of the project, and that must be public for all to be motivated, either if they are forward in the results, in order to maintain its leadership, as if they are behind to overcome.

8 YOU WILL MAKE THE RESULTS EVALUATION AND THE AUDITS

The Results should be evaluated so much "A priori", whatever I hope to obtain, like "A posteriori", whatever I obtained. On the other hand you must develop Audits to assure the quality of the process, as well as the applicability, good sense, feasibility and worth-doing of the defined tasks and results.

There must be done an assessment of results achievable with the RCM, both "A Priori" and "A Posteriori" of the project.

The A Priori evaluation must emerge from the criticality analysis, following the guidelines already set out in section 2.

It is therefore advisable to make estimates "pessimistic" and "optimistic" in order to obtain a range of possible outcomes.

The A Posteriori evaluation must come from comparing New Plan obtained by RCM, with the Old Plan, both in costs and in results (risk, safety, environment, availability, reliability, productivity, etc.).

The A Posteriori result calculation allows to correct or confirm the estimates made A Priori, and therefore now based on experience and numbers earned by the company in its own plant, perhaps achieving justifications "more credible" within the company, and so for enabling better support for the subsequent phases of development of the project.

It should be Audited every Analysis and its Implementation.

The analysis audits must be both Internal, to validate the outcome technically, and that those responsible for the assets are satisfied with the achievements (conducted by the person technically responsible of the assets, ex. Plant Manager, Maintenance Manager, etc.); and External as to validate the correct application of the RCM technique (conducted by outside consultants certified in RCM).

The Auditors should assess both the analysis content, and the results, so as to ensure both qualitatively and quantitatively the success of the process.
Remember that the process of Audit and Control is the key to close the cycle of continuous improvement.

9 YOU WILL EXPAND THE PROJECT

If the results and the audits guarantee it, the project must continue. For this, new cycles of Planning-Control-Results-Audit, must be made. The expansion must be continuous and be supported to assure the target of reaching the "critical mass" that allows, in the long term, to assure the continuity of the project. Remember that the RCM is not a fashion, it is a life style!

If the results and the audits of the Pilot Project showed positive signs and were successful, then Top Management of the Company certainly will endorse a decision to expand the application of the RCM technique to other parts of the plant or the Company.

According to that we must repeat steps 6, 7 and 8, involving the Planning, Implementation, Control, Results and Audit.

That expansion should also be made step by step, measuring the resources that can be assigned to each stage.
The expansion project should be developed not in a hurry but without breaks, because in the early stages the process of change is still immature, and abandon them to their fate will lose all the benefits obtained.

Our experience shows that in order to achieve a critical mass that will allow to assure successful long term RCM implementation within a company, you should at least achieve with training and experience in RCM group analysis, to not less than 15% of staff and personnel of the entire company for large companies, and not less than 25% for small businesses.

The priorities for the expansion project should continue according to the criticality analysis made at the beginning of the process.

10 YOU WILL ENJOY RELIABILITY

As the project goes on, you must inform and communicate to Top Management, as much as to all the colleagues in the Company about the project development. This is the way to assure the results and the application of the decisions made. You must show the results obtained. If you did your job well, successfully results will appear.
Enjoy the prestige gained, without falling asleep in the laurels. Enjoy the possibility of returning home early, proud to work in a safer plant.
Enjoy Reliability!

As the project advances, we must communicate both to Top Management and the rest of the staff and personnel of the company, the progress and results achieved.
To do so not only it should be used the formality of a report, but also is recommended holding events and special shows, as well as the support of a well-planned communication campaign, on the progress and results achieved by the project.

In this campaign, we recommend the use of all audiovisual media and graphics that are available: billboards, newsletters, corporate magazines, website of the company, badges, promotional clothing, and so on.

It should be identified prominently in the assets in which we have put in place new plans studied with RCM, in order to improve the "visual presence" of RCM on the ground.

Display in billboards the "Functions of the Asset", for each asset, which are the objectives of maintaining them.
After this, and if the job has been done well, the results begin to come without any doubt, and these will be good.

Thus begin to enjoy gradually the improvement of the plant condition, the improvement of the assets condition, its greater availability, its greater reliability, better performance costs, increased safety and better care of the environment.

Start enjoying the prestige gained for a job well done,

Start enjoying the relief of stress because of having a more reliable plant,

Begin to enjoy the joy of the Family to have their father, mother, brothers, sisters, sons and daughters; healthy, safe and early returned home.

In short, ENJOY THE RELIABILITY!


Author:
Santiago Sotuyo Blanco, IE, CMRP


Related: Download the RCM Project Managers Guide


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